Tag: sleep apnea

Sleep Apnea And Heart Disease: Killers Together!

Alright, maybe the snoring device itself isn’t going to actually kill you, but there are some issues they just can’t solve. Of the various sleep disorders out there, one of the most major ones is sleep apnea: specifically obstructive sleep apnea. This means that while a person sleeps, their airways are being blocked enough that they will actually stop breathing. Many people who suffer with obstructive sleep apnea use a special machine to help them breathe at night.

There are some people who have found success with mouthpieces like ZQuiet (http://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/zquiet) while they sleep as there are those designed to keep your airways open by supporting one of the worst blockage culprits, your tongue, in place. While this is all well and good (and even desired) there is one disease that goes hand-in-hand with sleep apnea that mouthpieces can’t deal with. Heart disease:

In “Impact of Mandibular Advancement Therapy on Endothelial Function in Severe Obstructive Sleep Apnea,” French researchers report on a randomized controlled trial of 150 patients with severe sleep apnea and no overt cardiovascular disease who received either a mandibular advancement device (MAD) or a sham oral appliance.

The researchers found MAD therapy significantly improved the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) scores, micro-arousal index scores, and symptoms of snoring, fatigue, and sleepiness. However, MAD did not improve endothelial function, a key predictor of cardiovascular disease, or lower blood pressure.

Continuous positive airway pressure, or CPAP, is considered the “gold standard” of obstructive sleep apnea treatment. However, many patients find it uncomfortable, and MAD is the most commonly prescribed alternative.

“Endothelial dysfunction is one of the intermediate mechanisms that potentially contribute to the increased risk of cardiovascular disease in OSA,” said lead study author Frédéric Gagnadoux, MD, professor of pulmonology at the University Hospital of Angers in France. “Whether MAD therapy improves endothelial function in OSA patients had not been evaluated before in properly controlled and adequately powered trials.”

Patients in the current study had an AHI > 30. They ranged in age from 18-70, and 86 percent were men. None had signs of cardiovascular disease. Although their AHI scores were indicative of severe sleep apnea, participants reported only mild daytime sleepiness. A strength of the study, which lasted two months, was that compliance with using MAD was high, as verified by researchers using a tiny embedded monitor.

Via: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/01/170127112856.htm

It’s a daunting thing to grapple with. Being diagnosed with sleep apnea doesn’t mean your life is over, it just means there are more things you need to consider in order to remain healthy. The important thing to take away from this is that you can’t cut corners. Sleep apnea is a serious disorder with real consequences. This goes beyond trying to stop snoring because it bothers your partner. When your life is at risk you need to do everything in your power to retain a quality of life and living that you are proud of. You can’t just slap a mouthpiece in and think everything is great. Will it stop the snoring? Sure! That’s what it’s designed to do. But it also has limitations. Your heart isn’t affected by what you wear in your mouth at night. Not enough to keep heart disease at bay. Listen to your doctor and make sure you’re doing what you can to have a happy, healthy sleep.

Hello Sleep: Bedroom Tech for Everyone

A downside to any wearable device that can help you track your sleep is that many of them are uncomfortable. Comfort is of the essence when you’re trying to get a good night’s sleep and having something bulky on your wrist or something wrapped around your head isn’t necessarily going to make things any better for you. Comfort is one of the biggest challenges that all sleep aids face. Mouthpieces are being made in different sizes with softer materials and wearables are getting thinner and lighter. Sleep monitoring gadgets are everywhere. What if you didn’t have to strap something your your body to find out how you’re sleeping or if you need to do anything to adjust your sleep posture? With this clip on your pillow and an interesting glowing ball on your nightstand, you can:

James Proud is a man on a mission to fix our sleep. This one-time recipient of Peter Thiel’s “skip-college-and-build-things-instead” fellowship is convinced that building gadgets for the home is the best way to improve our lives through tech. And improving sleep, he’s sure, is the place to start.

His company, Hello, makes the Sense, a glowing orb that pairs with a clip that you attach to your pillow and connects with a phone app. The system monitors the conditions in your bedroom and charts them so that, over time, you get a better handle on what helps you improve your sleep.

Proud’s sleep tracker is one of the latest devices to tackle what the Centers for Disease Control has declared a “public health problem”: insufficient sleep. Others have gotten into the act, including Fitbit, Apple and its “bedtime” feature, and many other apps. The desire for us to get better sleep is so great that sleep tech even has its own section at the tech industry’s CES trade show this year, for the first time in the show’s 25-year history.

But Proud envisions something different for Hello. “When looking at all of the wearables, we saw that people were fascinated with their sleep. But for all of these wearable devices, it was tacked on,” he said. “So we said, let’s focus on that foundation. We have to go further than what you would do with a wearable device, and find out what’s going on in the room.”

Sense gives you more information than just the number of hours you spend in bed. Besides tracking your room’s conditions, the orb half of the system doubles as a white noise machine and glowing alarm clock. The latest model can even take voice commands that will let you control the smart lights in your bedroom or lower the thermostat.

Via: http://www.dailyherald.com/article/20161231/business/161239926/

Here we’ve got technology that is minimal on the invasiveness. Take this technology, add the VitalSleep mouthpiece to it (see a VitalSleep Review here), and your sleep apnea is bound to get under control. While it will bring your phone back into the bedroom, you get more information than just what you, as a person, are doing. By checking out the entire sleeping environment a picture is painted in it’s entirety. Maybe your room is too hot or cold, maybe there is a noise that happens at 3am that slightly wakes you up that you never noticed before. Compiling all the information in an easy to read format is one way to get your sleep concerns in one place. What you do with the information is up to you.

How Smart Is Your Bed?

Snoring is one of those issues that plagues more people than you probably realize. In fact, you may snore yourself and just not know it! If you sleep alone you probably are in the dark on any potential snoring issues. When there’s no one there to stab you in the side because you’re keeping them awake, it’s hard to see you have an issue. There are several causes, and treatments, for snoring. Some of the major causes are being overweight, smoking or drinking heavily before bed, stress and plain old muscle relaxation. You can exercise, scale back on bad habits and do yoga to reduce your stress but it’s a bit hard to combat muscles relaxing. Unless you have super control of your muscles. Then that’s a different story.

When your muscles relax too much your tongue will fall to the back of your throat and the muscles will loosen. This vibration on loose flesh is what causes the sound we’re all to familiar with. Various mouthpieces designed to either push your jaw forward to increase airflow (like: http://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/zquiet) or hold your tongue in place ((like: http://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/good-morning-snore-solution)can assist with this issue.

But what else can you do?

As our houses get smarter and smarter technology is slowly creeping into the bedroom:

After a full day of meetings at CES 2017, I noticed a few trends that could bubble up beyond some of the bigger ones that get a lot of the media’s attention. Roaming around a large hotel ballroom (The Mirage Events Center, actually) during the Pepcom Digital Experience event, I noticed a LOT of individual products, but some of them have coalesced into themes to watch during the year.

Technology hits the bedroom

Humans spend about 1/3 of their life sleeping or trying to sleep, so it’s been interesting to see that products are finally addressing our needs for a better night’s sleep. Companies and products like Smart Nora, the Zeeq Smart Pillow and Sleepace all have different approaches towards alleviating the annoyance of someone snoring (alleviating for the partner, since it probably doesn’t bother you if you’re the snorer). Different approaches are used by some of the products – the Nora device, for example, uses a small device that raises the pillow slightly to get you to move when snoring is detected through its sound sensor. The Zeeq includes speakers (which let you play music to help you get to sleep) that can activate when it detects snoring.

The big company in this space is Sleep Number Bed, which was at the event showing off its new Sleep Number 360 Smart Bed. The entire mattress system includes the anti-snoring approach (the bed adjusts the position when snoring is detected), but also includes a warming feature, biometric sensors and other health data abilities to help customers get their 40 winks in an easier manner.

Via: http://www.networkworld.com/article/3155005/consumer-electronics/ces-2017-early-trends-and-thoughts.html

A bevvy of cold-footed humans are very excited about the warming feature but for snorers, to have a bed that will automatically tilt you to help stop snoring is a great idea. If your bed does it for you there’s no need to stab  your partner in the ribs or be concerned that your snoring is shaking the windows and you don’t know it.

While some people might be hesitant to have technology in their beds, others will see it as progressive. There’s no denying that these are all fantastic ideas, but they are going to cost you a pretty penny. Before you get too wrapped up in the idea of buying a smart bed, maybe you should start saving your nickels and dimes. While it might take you a while to save for it, it’ll be that much sweeter when you can afford it.

Say Ah: What’s in Your Mouth?

mouthSnoring is a common sleep disorder although many just brush it off. Some people think snoring is caused solely by eating or drinking too much before bed, sleeping on your back or being sick. While these can contribute to snoring, the fact of the matter is that there are physical components of snoring. While you sleep your whole body relaxes, right? The means more than just your mind; your muscles relax as well. When the muscles in your mouth and throat relax they can cause your tongue to fall to the back of your throat and block your airways.

This causes that snoring sound we are all too familiar with. The kind that can only be remedied with a stop snoring mouthpiece like the ZQuiet (http://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/zquiet). If the situation is intense, snoring may also be a sign of sleep apnea. Sleep apnea is a disorder that causes a person to stop breathing completely, for a few seconds, dozens of times a night. There are other physical betrayals for sleep apnea:

Enlarged uvula can lead to snoring and obstructive sleep apnea. Among normal adults, 45 percent are occasional snorers and 25 percent are habitual snorers. Most commonly seen in males, snoring may be a result of an obstruction, so it should be considered a serious symptom to address with your doctor.

There are numerous causes for snoring, including poor muscle tone of the tongue and throat, excessive bulkiness of throat tissue, long soft palate or uvula, or obstructed nasal airways.

Snoring can result in a health condition known as obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), which is when a person stops breathing numerous times throughout the night. Being overweight or having high blood pressure can contribute to OSA, but another common cause is an enlarged uvula, the dangling piece of flesh at the back of the mouth.

The role of uvula is not fully understood, but its possible functions are assisting with speech formation and production of saliva.

Inflamed or swollen uvula is the main symptom of a health condition uvulitis, which can contribute to sleep apnea. If the uvula becomes very swollen, it may even reach the tongue, causing an obstruction. Other signs and symptoms of a swollen uvula include redness, as well as difficulty breathing or swallowing.

If your uvulitis does lead to sleep apnea, you may also suffer from high blood pressure, daytime headache, constant low energy or fatigue, and weight gain. Treating enlarged uvula and sleep apnea is important for reducing your risk of complications.

Enlarged uvula treatment methods

You should see a doctor for your enlarged uvula if you experience severe pain, difficulty breathing, uneasiness due to lack of oxygen, severe pain or difficulty swallowing, grunting and choking, pus or blood from the uvula, or if you stop breathing throughout the night.

Via: http://www.belmarrahealth.com/enlarged-uvula-can-lead-to-snoring-and-obstructive-sleep-apnea/

Snoring can be a very real indicator that you or someone you love suffers from sleep apnea. The problem with this disease is that it can often go undiagnosed for those who live alone or for those who brush off their snoring issue. It is imperative if you snore, and have continued to do so even after you’ve tried to stop it, that you meet with a health care professional. You may need to undergo testing in a sleep lab to find out if you suffer from sleep apnea. Don’t wait until it’s too late!