Tag: sleep apnea

Obstructive Sleep Apnea 101: What You Need To Know About It

We are more familiar now with the sleep disorder that is sleep apnea. It is the most common diagnosed sleep disorder in sleep clinics and affects a great majority of the population wherever you are in the world. We know that we need sleep to function normally throughout the day but there are times when sleeping at night is easier said than done. Some people don’t have any problem drifting off to sleep once they hit the sack but there are also those who dread bedtime either because of sleeping difficulties or a snoring partner.

Snoring is the characteristic symptom of sleep apnea. While it is often annoying to sleep beside snorers, it is also a cause of concern as snoring is a serious sign of breathing issues. It has even been discovered that the heart of people who suffer from sleep apnea also temporarily stops beating when they sleep (which can be aided with this: http://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/snorerx). This condition is no laughing matter and requires immediate medical attention or risk not being able to wake up the following day.

If you stop breathing while you’re sleeping, you may have sleep apnea. Sleep apnea affects over 18 million adults and can take three forms. The first is called central sleep apnea, which is where the brain fails to notify the muscles to control breathing. This type of sleep apnea is less common and does not cause snoring. The second kind of sleep apnea is obstructive sleep apnea, which occurs when the soft tissue of the throat relaxes during sleep and blocks the airway, resulting in snoring. Finally, the third form is called complex sleep apnea and is a combination of the two previous forms.

(Via: http://www.belmarrahealth.com/stop-breathing-sleeping-affect-body/)

Imagine how scary it is to find out that your life is in this much danger because of snoring. Not only you and your partner lose precious sleep and predispose you to other deadly diseases but the thought of your breathing and heart stopping in your slumber can send shivers down your spine.

He said: “Yes. It is estimated that five per cent of the adult population in the UK it  that is 1.5 million. 

“Of those, more than 600,000 will have moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnoea which can be a serious threat to health. 

“Undiagnosed, it can lead to excessive tiredness, interfering with a person’s ability to carry out complex functions like driving a motorcycle, car, truck or bus, flying a plane, driving a train or tram or operating machinery.” 

If you have obstructive sleep apnoea which affects your ability to drive safely or obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome you must notify the DVLA. 

You could be fined up to £1,000 if you don’t tell DVLA about a medical condition that affects your driving and you may be prosecuted if you are involved in an accident as a result.

Obstructive sleep apnoea can also lead to high blood pressure, irritability, under performance at work, diabetes, depression, extreme mood swings and other health problems.

(Via: http://www.express.co.uk/life-style/health/743409/sleep-apnoea-definition-symptoms-apnea)

We now know what sleep apnea is:

Sleep apnea is a sleep disorder that causes you to stop and start breathing repeatedly throughout the night. For most people, sleep apnea is caused by “some sort of obstruction in airflow in the back of the throat which blocks air from getting into the lungs as you sleep,” Joseph Ojile, M.D., medical director of the Clayton Sleep Institute, tells SELF. This could be due to large tonsils, congested sinuses, or a variety of other factors. In rare cases, it can be caused by a problem in signaling, so that your brain doesn’t send the message to breathe correctly.

And the health risks involved:

Untreated sleep apnea can, over the years, contribute to chronic disease like type 2 diabetes and heart disease, so getting a proper diagnosis is important for your long-term health. Here are the top symptoms of sleep apnea you need to know.

Here are the common sleep apnea symptoms to watch out for:

  1. You’re exhausted all day despite getting plenty of sleep.

  2. You wake up with headaches.

  3. You wake yourself up gasping or choking.

  4. Your bed partner says you snore, choke, gasp—or stop breathing—when you sleep.

  5. You have high blood pressure.

  6. You experience heart palpitations, “fluttering” in your chest, or your heart is pounding for no apparent reason.

  7. You have high blood sugar.

  8. You have insomnia.

  9. Your mood is all over the place.

(Via: http://www.self.com/story/9-signs-you-might-have-sleep-apnea)

While it remains to be a serious health issue, there are different sleep apnea treatments and managements to choose from, so you can sleep soundly once again. It does not always have to be CPAP for all. There are more anti-snoring devices like http://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/zquiet that you can choose from like anti-snoring mouthpieces and mouthguards that are more convenient to use and provide the same benefits as other traditional treatments.

It is not the end of the world if you have sleep apnea. Many people are also diagnosed with it and many have managed to overcome it for good. Technology – although a major distraction in itself – has provided us with effective and affordable snoring solutions that fit most lifestyles. You can sleep soundly at night knowing you can possibly beat sleep apnea and get the sleep your body needs and deserves.

Good Morning Snore Solution: Sleep Apnea Fighter!

Sleep is a fundamental human need. Whatever your age or gender is, we all sleep at the end of the day. Losing sleep not only leaves you feeling grumpy and exhausted but can put you at risk of serious health conditions like cardiovascular diseases, among others. Sleep deprivation also speeds up aging and makes you look older than your real age.

However, it is not your fault that you lack sleep. Sometimes, conditions like sleep apnea can mess with your sleeping and that of your significant other too. While most people ignore sleep apnea, it actually is a serious condition that can require immediate medical attention.

Getting a good night’s rest is essential for good health, but people with sleep apnea aren’t able to succumb to slumber. Affecting an estimated 100 million people world-wide, obstructive sleep apnea causes episodes of stopped breathing during sleep, and the result is a fragmented, restless sleep that leaves sufferers exhausted and drowsy during the day. Here, five men and women speak about living with sleep apnea. 

(Via: https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2017/01/01/well/patient-voices-sleepapnea.html?_r=0)

It is actually easy to diagnose sleep apnea because of its characteristic symptom: snoring. However, since snoring affects many people, most of us tend to brush it off aside and consider it as one of those things you have to endure in life. The sad thing about snoring, though, is that it can actually be fatal especially in the elderly.

Sleep experts agree that chronic poor sleep in general and obstructive sleep apnea in particular (OSA) in anyone, but especially in older adults, can be fatal. They say they’re heartbreaking, literally.

“I’d just like to further stress the seriousness of obstructive sleep apnea and how it can hurt hearts,” said. Dr. Raj Dasgupta, MD, a Fellow of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) and assistant professor of clinical medicine at the Keck School of Medicine at the University of Southern California (USC). “Research shows untreated, severe obstructive sleep apnea more than doubles your risk of dying from heart disease.”

Dasgupta is referring to a study done last year by several departments of otolaryngology, head and neck surgery and sleep medicine at Shanghai Jiao Tong University in China. The authors analyzed electronic data from some 27 studies of more than 3 million people all over the world that evaluated the associations between OSA and all causes of death, paying close attention to cardiovascular events.

Researchers found that all deaths, and specifically cardiovascular mortality, were significantly lower in CPAP-treated than in untreated patients. Thus the researchers concluded that “Greater attention should be paid to severe OSA, as it is an independent predictor for risk for all-cause and cardiovascular mortality.” They further stated that “CPAP is an effective treatment that reduces risk of mortality.”

(Via: https://www.forbes.com/sites/robinseatonjefferson/2017/03/28/could-losing-sleep-be-killing-you/#7deb76a96467)

The risk of death is real among older people, so sleep apnea should be treated as soon as possible and can be greatly advanced with the help of a medical expert who has specialized in sleep apnea treatment.

In most cases the initial treatment approach is a combination of lifestyle and behavioral modifications including weight loss and avoidance of alcohol use at night and the use of CPAP, short for continuous positive airway pressure device. While CPAP is very effective in keeping the throat open and a great solution for some, struggling with its continued use is not uncommon.

A wealth of possible treatments from oral appliances, throat exercises, and nasal resistors (just to name) a few are available. However, some patients prefer not to use any attachments or devices while they sleep and opt for a surgical solution. 

(Via: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/precision-just-what-you-need-for-sleep-apnea-treatment_us_58cb4d9ee4b07112b6472c3b)

While there is no perfect solution for sleep apnea, there are different medical tools and strategies one can adopt to relieve them of this excessive narrowing of the airway during sleep. With the help of your doctor and your family, it is possible to get that good night’s sleep again without the constant bother and threat of snoring – and worse, sleep apnea. If snoring is a constant issue, get yourself tested now and explore which combination of devices and techniques will ensure that you can stop your snoring!

Don’t Ignore the Alarm: Too Much Sleep Can Kill You

As we get older we start agonizing over the fact that we don’t get to sleep in as much as we used to. As teenagers, it would be a miracle for us to crawl out of bed before noon on a Saturday. Small children tend to sleep anywhere from 10-12 hours a day, even if the hours they choose aren’t to parents liking. It shouldn’t be a secret that as you get older you require less sleep than you did when you were younger. Our bodies aren’t growing any more so there is no need to snooze for extended periods of time. It’s hard to get in that mindframe, however, that the 6 hours you’ve been getting are actually enough when you’re mentally exhausted. It’s important to realize, however,that too much sleep isn’t good for you:

Can’t sleep? You aren’t alone: In 2011, Laval University researchers published a study of 2,000 Canadians that found 40 per cent of respondents had experienced one or more symptoms of insomnia – taking more than 30 minutes to fall asleep, waking up during the night for more than 30 minutes, or waking up 30 minutes earlier than they wanted to.

A November 2016 report by the non-profit research organization RAND Europe calculated that Canada loses 80,000 working days, at a cost of $21.4-billion a year, due to lack of sleep.

But how those sleepless hours affect us depends on a number of factors, including gender, age and the time you spend asleep. Here’s what some of the latest research tells us:

Sleeping too long can kill you, too: Typically, adults sleep anywhere from seven to nine hours. Getting too little certainly isn’t good for your health. But repeated, larger-scale population studies by researchers in Norway and Taiwan found that sleeping more than eight hours was also linked to an increased risk of dying from certain kinds of heart disease, even adjusting for many other health factors.

Those are big-data findings, but, individually, everyone has their own sleep sweet spot. It’s tricky to find it, though tracking your sleep patterns with a diary is a good step. Ideally, though, suggests Dr. Elliott Lee, a sleep specialist at the Royal Ottawa Hospital, you’d go on holiday for two weeks, turn off the alarm and go to sleep when you are tired and wake up naturally. Take the average, and that’s how much sleep your body naturally needs. If only we could get a prescription for that.

Sleep isn’t gender-neutral: Historically, most sleep studies have been conducted on men, and it was assumed those results could simply be applied to women. That’s been proven wrong, says Lee. Women’s sleep is often negatively affected by pregnancy, menstrual cycles and menopause. Women report higher rates of insomnia than men, but, until menopause, are diagnosed with significantly lower rates of sleep apnea. Women also appear to be more sensitive than men to sleep deprivation. Although the research isn’t conclusive yet, Lee also suggests that treating sleep problems can help women struggling with infertility.

Via: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/health-and-fitness/health/four-things-to-know-about-sleep-and-your-health-sleepless/article33764746/

As much as we want to stay in bed all day, we can’t. There are things to do and adult responsibilities to consider. If you’re feeling drained in the morning and you know you’ve slept at least 8 hours, there is probably something else at play with your lack of energy. Review your diet and daily exercise while you investigate the cause. Talk to your doctor and have your blood checked for iron levels and other medical possibilities. Consider a mouthpiece like the extremely popular Good Morning Snore Solution (http://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/good-morning-snore-solution). Don’t put yourself at risk for heart disease. You don’t want to be the new Rip Van Winkle. Remember, even though it took him awhile, he at least woke up.

Sleep Apnea And Heart Disease: Killers Together!

Alright, maybe the snoring device itself isn’t going to actually kill you, but there are some issues they just can’t solve. Of the various sleep disorders out there, one of the most major ones is sleep apnea: specifically obstructive sleep apnea. This means that while a person sleeps, their airways are being blocked enough that they will actually stop breathing. Many people who suffer with obstructive sleep apnea use a special machine to help them breathe at night.

There are some people who have found success with mouthpieces like ZQuiet (http://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/zquiet) while they sleep as there are those designed to keep your airways open by supporting one of the worst blockage culprits, your tongue, in place. While this is all well and good (and even desired) there is one disease that goes hand-in-hand with sleep apnea that mouthpieces can’t deal with. Heart disease:

In “Impact of Mandibular Advancement Therapy on Endothelial Function in Severe Obstructive Sleep Apnea,” French researchers report on a randomized controlled trial of 150 patients with severe sleep apnea and no overt cardiovascular disease who received either a mandibular advancement device (MAD) or a sham oral appliance.

The researchers found MAD therapy significantly improved the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) scores, micro-arousal index scores, and symptoms of snoring, fatigue, and sleepiness. However, MAD did not improve endothelial function, a key predictor of cardiovascular disease, or lower blood pressure.

Continuous positive airway pressure, or CPAP, is considered the “gold standard” of obstructive sleep apnea treatment. However, many patients find it uncomfortable, and MAD is the most commonly prescribed alternative.

“Endothelial dysfunction is one of the intermediate mechanisms that potentially contribute to the increased risk of cardiovascular disease in OSA,” said lead study author Frédéric Gagnadoux, MD, professor of pulmonology at the University Hospital of Angers in France. “Whether MAD therapy improves endothelial function in OSA patients had not been evaluated before in properly controlled and adequately powered trials.”

Patients in the current study had an AHI > 30. They ranged in age from 18-70, and 86 percent were men. None had signs of cardiovascular disease. Although their AHI scores were indicative of severe sleep apnea, participants reported only mild daytime sleepiness. A strength of the study, which lasted two months, was that compliance with using MAD was high, as verified by researchers using a tiny embedded monitor.

Via: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/01/170127112856.htm

It’s a daunting thing to grapple with. Being diagnosed with sleep apnea doesn’t mean your life is over, it just means there are more things you need to consider in order to remain healthy. The important thing to take away from this is that you can’t cut corners. Sleep apnea is a serious disorder with real consequences. This goes beyond trying to stop snoring because it bothers your partner. When your life is at risk you need to do everything in your power to retain a quality of life and living that you are proud of. You can’t just slap a mouthpiece in and think everything is great. Will it stop the snoring? Sure! That’s what it’s designed to do. But it also has limitations. Your heart isn’t affected by what you wear in your mouth at night. Not enough to keep heart disease at bay. Listen to your doctor and make sure you’re doing what you can to have a happy, healthy sleep.

Hello Sleep: Bedroom Tech for Everyone

A downside to any wearable device that can help you track your sleep is that many of them are uncomfortable. Comfort is of the essence when you’re trying to get a good night’s sleep and having something bulky on your wrist or something wrapped around your head isn’t necessarily going to make things any better for you. Comfort is one of the biggest challenges that all sleep aids face. Mouthpieces are being made in different sizes with softer materials and wearables are getting thinner and lighter. Sleep monitoring gadgets are everywhere. What if you didn’t have to strap something your your body to find out how you’re sleeping or if you need to do anything to adjust your sleep posture? With this clip on your pillow and an interesting glowing ball on your nightstand, you can:

James Proud is a man on a mission to fix our sleep. This one-time recipient of Peter Thiel’s “skip-college-and-build-things-instead” fellowship is convinced that building gadgets for the home is the best way to improve our lives through tech. And improving sleep, he’s sure, is the place to start.

His company, Hello, makes the Sense, a glowing orb that pairs with a clip that you attach to your pillow and connects with a phone app. The system monitors the conditions in your bedroom and charts them so that, over time, you get a better handle on what helps you improve your sleep.

Proud’s sleep tracker is one of the latest devices to tackle what the Centers for Disease Control has declared a “public health problem”: insufficient sleep. Others have gotten into the act, including Fitbit, Apple and its “bedtime” feature, and many other apps. The desire for us to get better sleep is so great that sleep tech even has its own section at the tech industry’s CES trade show this year, for the first time in the show’s 25-year history.

But Proud envisions something different for Hello. “When looking at all of the wearables, we saw that people were fascinated with their sleep. But for all of these wearable devices, it was tacked on,” he said. “So we said, let’s focus on that foundation. We have to go further than what you would do with a wearable device, and find out what’s going on in the room.”

Sense gives you more information than just the number of hours you spend in bed. Besides tracking your room’s conditions, the orb half of the system doubles as a white noise machine and glowing alarm clock. The latest model can even take voice commands that will let you control the smart lights in your bedroom or lower the thermostat.

Via: http://www.dailyherald.com/article/20161231/business/161239926/

Here we’ve got technology that is minimal on the invasiveness. Take this technology, add the VitalSleep mouthpiece to it (see a VitalSleep Review here), and your sleep apnea is bound to get under control. While it will bring your phone back into the bedroom, you get more information than just what you, as a person, are doing. By checking out the entire sleeping environment a picture is painted in it’s entirety. Maybe your room is too hot or cold, maybe there is a noise that happens at 3am that slightly wakes you up that you never noticed before. Compiling all the information in an easy to read format is one way to get your sleep concerns in one place. What you do with the information is up to you.

How Smart Is Your Bed?

Snoring is one of those issues that plagues more people than you probably realize. In fact, you may snore yourself and just not know it! If you sleep alone you probably are in the dark on any potential snoring issues. When there’s no one there to stab you in the side because you’re keeping them awake, it’s hard to see you have an issue. There are several causes, and treatments, for snoring. Some of the major causes are being overweight, smoking or drinking heavily before bed, stress and plain old muscle relaxation. You can exercise, scale back on bad habits and do yoga to reduce your stress but it’s a bit hard to combat muscles relaxing. Unless you have super control of your muscles. Then that’s a different story.

When your muscles relax too much your tongue will fall to the back of your throat and the muscles will loosen. This vibration on loose flesh is what causes the sound we’re all to familiar with. Various mouthpieces designed to either push your jaw forward to increase airflow (like: http://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/zquiet) or hold your tongue in place ((like: http://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/good-morning-snore-solution)can assist with this issue.

But what else can you do?

As our houses get smarter and smarter technology is slowly creeping into the bedroom:

After a full day of meetings at CES 2017, I noticed a few trends that could bubble up beyond some of the bigger ones that get a lot of the media’s attention. Roaming around a large hotel ballroom (The Mirage Events Center, actually) during the Pepcom Digital Experience event, I noticed a LOT of individual products, but some of them have coalesced into themes to watch during the year.

Technology hits the bedroom

Humans spend about 1/3 of their life sleeping or trying to sleep, so it’s been interesting to see that products are finally addressing our needs for a better night’s sleep. Companies and products like Smart Nora, the Zeeq Smart Pillow and Sleepace all have different approaches towards alleviating the annoyance of someone snoring (alleviating for the partner, since it probably doesn’t bother you if you’re the snorer). Different approaches are used by some of the products – the Nora device, for example, uses a small device that raises the pillow slightly to get you to move when snoring is detected through its sound sensor. The Zeeq includes speakers (which let you play music to help you get to sleep) that can activate when it detects snoring.

The big company in this space is Sleep Number Bed, which was at the event showing off its new Sleep Number 360 Smart Bed. The entire mattress system includes the anti-snoring approach (the bed adjusts the position when snoring is detected), but also includes a warming feature, biometric sensors and other health data abilities to help customers get their 40 winks in an easier manner.

Via: http://www.networkworld.com/article/3155005/consumer-electronics/ces-2017-early-trends-and-thoughts.html

A bevvy of cold-footed humans are very excited about the warming feature but for snorers, to have a bed that will automatically tilt you to help stop snoring is a great idea. If your bed does it for you there’s no need to stab  your partner in the ribs or be concerned that your snoring is shaking the windows and you don’t know it.

While some people might be hesitant to have technology in their beds, others will see it as progressive. There’s no denying that these are all fantastic ideas, but they are going to cost you a pretty penny. Before you get too wrapped up in the idea of buying a smart bed, maybe you should start saving your nickels and dimes. While it might take you a while to save for it, it’ll be that much sweeter when you can afford it.

Say Ah: What’s in Your Mouth?

mouthSnoring is a common sleep disorder although many just brush it off. Some people think snoring is caused solely by eating or drinking too much before bed, sleeping on your back or being sick. While these can contribute to snoring, the fact of the matter is that there are physical components of snoring. While you sleep your whole body relaxes, right? The means more than just your mind; your muscles relax as well. When the muscles in your mouth and throat relax they can cause your tongue to fall to the back of your throat and block your airways.

This causes that snoring sound we are all too familiar with. The kind that can only be remedied with a stop snoring mouthpiece like the ZQuiet (http://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/zquiet). If the situation is intense, snoring may also be a sign of sleep apnea. Sleep apnea is a disorder that causes a person to stop breathing completely, for a few seconds, dozens of times a night. There are other physical betrayals for sleep apnea:

Enlarged uvula can lead to snoring and obstructive sleep apnea. Among normal adults, 45 percent are occasional snorers and 25 percent are habitual snorers. Most commonly seen in males, snoring may be a result of an obstruction, so it should be considered a serious symptom to address with your doctor.

There are numerous causes for snoring, including poor muscle tone of the tongue and throat, excessive bulkiness of throat tissue, long soft palate or uvula, or obstructed nasal airways.

Snoring can result in a health condition known as obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), which is when a person stops breathing numerous times throughout the night. Being overweight or having high blood pressure can contribute to OSA, but another common cause is an enlarged uvula, the dangling piece of flesh at the back of the mouth.

The role of uvula is not fully understood, but its possible functions are assisting with speech formation and production of saliva.

Inflamed or swollen uvula is the main symptom of a health condition uvulitis, which can contribute to sleep apnea. If the uvula becomes very swollen, it may even reach the tongue, causing an obstruction. Other signs and symptoms of a swollen uvula include redness, as well as difficulty breathing or swallowing.

If your uvulitis does lead to sleep apnea, you may also suffer from high blood pressure, daytime headache, constant low energy or fatigue, and weight gain. Treating enlarged uvula and sleep apnea is important for reducing your risk of complications.

Enlarged uvula treatment methods

You should see a doctor for your enlarged uvula if you experience severe pain, difficulty breathing, uneasiness due to lack of oxygen, severe pain or difficulty swallowing, grunting and choking, pus or blood from the uvula, or if you stop breathing throughout the night.

Via: http://www.belmarrahealth.com/enlarged-uvula-can-lead-to-snoring-and-obstructive-sleep-apnea/

Snoring can be a very real indicator that you or someone you love suffers from sleep apnea. The problem with this disease is that it can often go undiagnosed for those who live alone or for those who brush off their snoring issue. It is imperative if you snore, and have continued to do so even after you’ve tried to stop it, that you meet with a health care professional. You may need to undergo testing in a sleep lab to find out if you suffer from sleep apnea. Don’t wait until it’s too late!