Category: Blog

Earplugs: Friend or Foe?

earplugDepending on what your sleep arrangements are like, you might be one of those who need to wear earplugs to get a good night’s sleep. Maybe you have a partner that snores or maybe you’re living in the middle of a construction zone. You could be one of those people who sleep so lightly that a fly breathing wakes you up or the party down the street is just a touch loud tonight. There are several ways to deal with excess noise when you’re trying to get a little shut-eye. Some people leave a fan running or use a white-noise machine. Some need to have specific music or an eye mask. Then there are those people who must have a pair of earplugs in to get some shut eye. The question then becomes, is that healthy?

Never put anything smaller than your elbow into your ear” is something we’ve been wisely cautioned against at some stage or another. But more of us are ignoring this advice.

We use in-the-ear-headphones to listen to music, car keys and hair pins to scratch that particularly unpleasant itch, and hearing aids to enable better communication.

Many of us also use disposable foam earplugs to protect from damaging noises in the workplace, or to block the noise of snoring partners, loud traffic outside bedroom windows, dogs barking and any other bothersome sounds that prevent a good night’s sleep.

If you regularly use earplugs to sleep, is it damaging? On the internet, people ask whether doing so can cause tinnitusinfections or ear pain. Can regular earplug use cause wax or pressure build up in the head? Can it cause headaches?

The facts about wax

To answer these questions, I should first explain a few things about ear wax.

Wax is good for the ear but too much can be bad for you. Wax comes from small glands in the outer part of the ear. It starts off looking like honey but the longer it stays in the ear, the darker and harder it gets as it traps dirt, grit and gunk.

Normally the wax will be “walked” out of the ear by its self-cleaning mechanism. Anything that slows down or reverses this mechanism can cause wax to build up. Unfortunately, anything smaller than your elbow can do this, sleeping plugs included. But everyone’s ears are affected differently.

An ear full of wax works like a built-in ear plug – great for sleeping, but if it ends up resting on the eardrum, it can cause discomfort and sometimes tinnitus.

Most of the problems people associate with earplugs are actually due to too much wax in the ears, although the wax may be caused by being a consistent earplug user.

If you are a consistent user and think you may have too much wax, ask your doctor to check inside your ear. Or better still, make an appointment to see your local audiologist. They may have a camera that can show you how much wax actually is inside your ear and whether something should be done about it.

A good night’s sleep

A good night’s sleep has many health benefits, and sleeping poorly can have follow-on issues such as concentration and memory problems.

Studies have demonstrated the benefit of sleeping aids such as ear plugs and eye masks in improving sleep for patients in hospitals. In fact, the studies show the aids can reduce the need for sleeping medications.

Via: http://theconversation.com/health-check-is-it-bad-to-regularly-sleep-wearing-earplugs-60374

The good news is that you won’t wreck your precious ears if you regularly wear earplugs to bed. The trick then becomes proper care and maintenance with said earplugs. Make sure you’re disposing them when they get too gross or it won’t just be snoring that prevents a good sleep.

Say Ah: What’s in Your Mouth?

mouthSnoring is a common sleep disorder although many just brush it off. Some people think snoring is caused solely by eating or drinking too much before bed, sleeping on your back or being sick. While these can contribute to snoring, the fact of the matter is that there are physical components of snoring. While you sleep your whole body relaxes, right? The means more than just your mind; your muscles relax as well. When the muscles in your mouth and throat relax they can cause your tongue to fall to the back of your throat and block your airways.

This causes that snoring sound we are all too familiar with. The kind that can only be remedied with a stop snoring mouthpiece like the ZQuiet (http://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/zquiet). If the situation is intense, snoring may also be a sign of sleep apnea. Sleep apnea is a disorder that causes a person to stop breathing completely, for a few seconds, dozens of times a night. There are other physical betrayals for sleep apnea:

Enlarged uvula can lead to snoring and obstructive sleep apnea. Among normal adults, 45 percent are occasional snorers and 25 percent are habitual snorers. Most commonly seen in males, snoring may be a result of an obstruction, so it should be considered a serious symptom to address with your doctor.

There are numerous causes for snoring, including poor muscle tone of the tongue and throat, excessive bulkiness of throat tissue, long soft palate or uvula, or obstructed nasal airways.

Snoring can result in a health condition known as obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), which is when a person stops breathing numerous times throughout the night. Being overweight or having high blood pressure can contribute to OSA, but another common cause is an enlarged uvula, the dangling piece of flesh at the back of the mouth.

The role of uvula is not fully understood, but its possible functions are assisting with speech formation and production of saliva.

Inflamed or swollen uvula is the main symptom of a health condition uvulitis, which can contribute to sleep apnea. If the uvula becomes very swollen, it may even reach the tongue, causing an obstruction. Other signs and symptoms of a swollen uvula include redness, as well as difficulty breathing or swallowing.

If your uvulitis does lead to sleep apnea, you may also suffer from high blood pressure, daytime headache, constant low energy or fatigue, and weight gain. Treating enlarged uvula and sleep apnea is important for reducing your risk of complications.

Enlarged uvula treatment methods

You should see a doctor for your enlarged uvula if you experience severe pain, difficulty breathing, uneasiness due to lack of oxygen, severe pain or difficulty swallowing, grunting and choking, pus or blood from the uvula, or if you stop breathing throughout the night.

Via: http://www.belmarrahealth.com/enlarged-uvula-can-lead-to-snoring-and-obstructive-sleep-apnea/

Snoring can be a very real indicator that you or someone you love suffers from sleep apnea. The problem with this disease is that it can often go undiagnosed for those who live alone or for those who brush off their snoring issue. It is imperative if you snore, and have continued to do so even after you’ve tried to stop it, that you meet with a health care professional. You may need to undergo testing in a sleep lab to find out if you suffer from sleep apnea. Don’t wait until it’s too late!

If You Want Good Grades, Get Some Sleep

collegeIt’s the time of year again. Students are swarming schools all over the country from kindergarten all the way to university and college. It’s back to school and that means a more regimented schedule should be implemented for everything. This includes parents as well as students. For those who are finding themselves in post-secondary for the first time might have a harder time trying to control themselves. Safeguards, like parents, might not be there and the newfound sense of independence and freedom could very well be their undoing.

If you want to be successful at anything in life, you need to put your best effort into it. This holds true for education. Lack of sleep can be the simplest cause of your undoing when it comes to performing in the workplace, and at school:

College students who deprive themselves of sleep are more at risk of losing academic success, according to health professional Dr. Keith Willmore.

Willmore, medical director of the BYU Student Health Clinic, said there is definitely a connection between lack of sleep and poor academic performance. He said cognitive functions are worsened due to sleep deprivation.

“Most students tend to stay up much later and sleep in, resulting in both less quantity and quality sleep,” Willmore said in an email.

Daniel Kay, an assistant professor of psychology, explained there is a danger for students when it comes to this “sleep debt.”

“‘Sleep debt’ as it’s called, accumulates over time,” Kay said. “So if an individual obtains 15 minutes less sleep than is needed on a nightly basis, after a week or two that starts to add up, and can have an impact of daytime functioning that is as great as going a whole night without sleep.”

An article written by Dr. Ronald D. Chervin and Dr. Shelley D. Hershner, published in the Journal of Nature and Science of Sleep, states “the consequences of sleep deprivation and daytime sleepiness are especially problematic to college students and can result in lower grade point averages, increased risk of academic failure, compromised learning, impaired mood and increased risk of motor vehicle accidents.”

Students who slept for more hours had higher grade point averages than shorter sleepers, according to the article.

The article also said “students with sleep disorders probably do not achieve optimal academic performance, and up to 27 percent of students may be at risk for at least one sleep disorder.”

Via: http://universe.byu.edu/2016/09/06/health-officials-say-lack-of-sleep-can-negatively-affect-students-grades/

University and college are not cheap, by any stretch of the imagination. Even if you’re lucky enough to be the recipient of a scholarship or have family who are able to pay the way, that’s still a hefty chunk of change. You don’t want all the hard effort you put into your courses to go down the drain because you’re having issues with your sleep schedule. Lack of sleep can be brutal for your health.

Like any other health concern you might have, you should visit a doctor if sleeping, or lack of sleep, is happening more often than not. It could be that you’re suffering from insomnia or maybe you snore in your sleep and need to wear a mouthpiece. It doesn’t have to be a struggle if you get help for it sooner rather than later. You just have to take charge of your life and if that means missing out on a party or two so you can get some proper sleep and not bomb that final exam in two days, then maybe that’s what you need to do.

Can You Afford to Ignore Your Snoring?

Unless you live comfortably as a member of the 1%, chances are you are attempting to be financially savvy by implementing a budget and adhering to it. The world costs money and we can only work ourselves to death so often before we really do die in our boots.

moneyIn order to be ready to put in those long hours either during your commute or at the office you need to make sure you’re getting a good night’s sleep. There are several variables that will impact your sleep health: your stress level, whether or not you consume drugs or alcohol before sleep and your overall sleep health. Many people have unhealthy relationships with their sleep which impacts their productivity during the day. Do you snore? Are you sure? Maybe no one has ever told you that you snore, but you still wake up feeling tired and like you didn’t get a wink at all.

This can be very dangerous for your health. You can face other problems that can end up costing you a lot of money:

ASM (American Academy of Sleep Medicine) declared that 29.4 million of residents in the country are suffering from obstructive sleep apnea. Sadly, only 20% of them know about it. In effect, the country spends $149.6 billion dollars for the treatment and the long term health consequences that results from it. If sleep apnea is not treated, this will significantly reduce the productivity of the individual. Numbers of vehicular accidents will also rise and workplace injuries.

Sleep apnea results to daytime sleepiness once untreated. This can be very risky, especially to drivers since they will be prone to road accidents 5 times more than those who don’t have any snoring issues. Hence, they will be more vulnerable to crash on the road.

Sleeping with someone who snores can be very irritating. And you can’t just take this for granted since this can be a symptom of a serious medical issue. In U.S., one out of 10 people has this problem which costs the country billions of dollars per year.

‘In sleep apnea, the mouth’s muscles do not work properly. Hence, every short period of time, the person stops breathing’, said Dr. Jennifer Caudle; a family medicine doctor in New Jersey. Sometimes, the person does not even know he has sleep apnea, Caudle said. Not knowing that you have this condition will put you in trouble. Once you stop breathing, you will snore, disrupting your normal sleep pattern. As a result, you will experience sleepiness and fatigue. If left untreated, this results to increased blood pressure, obesity, heart ailment and diabetes.

Via: http://www.newswatchngr.com/snoring-costs-the-country-149-6-billion-dollars-annually-66551

Medical care isn’t cheap and the longer you ignore a problem the worse, and more expensive, it will get. There are simple ways to deal with snoring, if that’s the affliction you suffer from. First and foremost you should meet with a sleep specialist and get yourself tested. You may need a referral from your primary health care provider. Your healthcare provider can also discuss various options with you. A mouthpiece like the ZQuiet (review here) may help alleviate your snoring if that is your issue.

Maybe you suffer from a sleep disorder because you have a lot of stress in your life. Or maybe you’re a bit overweight and need help losing the pounds. Whatever the case may be, speaking to a professional and getting some insight and assistance is the first thing that should be on your list.

Once you’ve identified the problem, you can work on the solution. The faster you catch it the better off you’ll be. This way you can save your hard earned money for something more gratifying, like that deluxe edition convertible or that expensive pair of shoes. Whatever your guilty pleasure is, wouldn’t it be nice to have a bit more cash to spend on it?

The Best Snoring Solutions Can Improve Your Relationships

Sleep does more for your life than replenish your energy stocks and help support the growth of new cells. Sleeping helps us relax and renew ourselves in more ways than one. But what if your sleep quality is poor, or worse, nonexistent?

bedMany people suffer from debilitating sleep disorders such as insomnia, sleep apnea and even snoring. While snoring might not seem that serious an issue, imagine this: you’re minding your own business, sleeping away, when you get a sharp elbow to the ribs from your partner. Unbeknownst to you, you were snoring. You roll over and continue to sleep only to be woken up by the lack of oxygen in your lungs from someone half-smothering you with a pillow. It sounds crazy, but it happens to so many people. Snoring is disruptive not only for the snorer but also for the person who shares the bed. Great snoring solutions can make a huge difference.

This is why sleep is so important for relationships. Do you think the snorer and the sleeper can talk to each other nicely when they’ve been keeping each other up all night in one way or another? Probably not. Many relationships, romantic or otherwise, will fall apart if the sleep disturbances are not addressed.

This article shows us why:

New research discovers that when husbands and wives get more sleep than on an average night, they are more satisfied with their marriages '” at least the following day.

In the study, Florida State University psychology professor Dr. Jim McNulty and graduate student Heather Maranges hypothesize that sleep is linked to self-regulation or self-control, which influences how married couples feel and think about their partner.

'The universality of our findings is important,' Maranges said. 'That is, we know all people need sleep. Regardless of the stage at which a couple is in their relationship or the cultural context in which they're embedded, each member of the couple can be adversely affected by not getting enough sleep.'

The paper appears in the Journal of Family Psychology.

The researchers believe sleep influences self-control. Self-control requires energy that can be replenished when our bodies are in the resting period known as sleep. In other words, sleep offers self-regulatory benefits to relationships.

'Up to one-third of married or cohabiting adults report that sleep problems burden their relationship,' the researchers wrote in the paper.

Other sleep studies have indicated that even partial sleep deprivation can have harmful effects on processes that require self-regulation, like evaluating how you feel about your partner.

However, results in this study revealed that differences between couples' sleep durations was not associated with differences in marital satisfaction. Because one couple gets more sleep than another does not mean that the couple that experienced more sleep viewed their marriage more favorably.

Maranges and McNulty conducted their research with 68 newlywed couples. Over a seven-day period, couples recorded the number of hours they slept and then responded to two sets of questions on a scale of one (not satisfied at all) to seven (extremely satisfied).

Via: http://psychcentral.com/news/2016/08/08/sleep-influences-relationship-satisfaction/108272.html? 

If you suffer from snoring you and your partner, if you have one, are not sleeping well. Have you noticed if you’ve been snappy to each other lately? Has the snoring always been an issue, or has it recently started? There are several causes of snoring and some of them you can address and combat on your own. It all depends on how much effort you’re willing to put into getting a good night’s sleep and a sweet good morning.

Unexpected Sleep Issues: What Snoring Tells Us

sleep_by_hannahboA lot of things in life are expected to occur. You’re expected to grow up, to finish some sort of schooling and to get a job. We expect to blink our eyes constantly throughout the day and no one ever realizes how many times they swallow until they suffer from a sore throat. Among other expected activities like breathing comes sleeping. We expect to sleep. Doctors and parents have been telling us we need to get at least eight hours of sleep a day. As children, we need more sleep because that’s when our bodies grow.

But what if your sleep wasn’t like what you expected? There are many people who can’t sleep even when they want to. There are others who attempt sleep but find their rest interrupted by snoring or tossing and turning. Your sleep is important and you need to ensure that you’re getting the right amount. So what does it mean when your sleep isn’t as typical as you were expecting?

Everybody sleeps. But not everybody sleeps the same way. So long as you're getting enough'”experts recommend 7 to 9 hours a night'”and you feel rested, you don’t need to sweat the occasional off night. However if you're not feeling rested, or your sleep is frequently disrupted, there might be something more important going on. Here's a look at 3 common sleep issues and what might be causing them.

Serious Snoring
Snoring is vibrational noise that happens when your breathing is partially obstructed by relaxed tissues in your throat. About half of adults snore at least occasionally, and for most it's not a big deal (except maybe for the person you're sleeping next to). 'Most people are unaware that they're snoring,' says Christopher Winter, MD, president of Charlottesville Neurology and Sleep Medicine and medical director at Martha Jefferson Hospital Sleep Medicine Center. 'and if you wake up feeling rested, it's not a problem.'

What is a problem is if you're snoring enough to cut off your breathing, and waking yourself up frequently during the night. This is a condition called sleep apnea, and it leaves sufferers chronically sleepy. 'You feel extremely tired during the day and fall asleep almost immediately when you sit down to relax,' says Winter. If this sounds like you, see a doctor. There are medical options like oral appliances or even minimally invasive surgery that can open your airway and allow you to get an uninterrupted night's rest.

Via: http://www.bicycling.com/training/health/what-your-sleep-might-be-trying-to-tell-you

Sleep is precious, almost more so than money. You can’t function without proper sleep and if you can’t function you can’t make that money you need to support your life. Being chronically sleepy leads to mistakes at work and irritability. These can cost you your job and put your life in jeopardy. It doesn’t take a genius to realize this is a potentially serious problem. That doesn’t mean you get to wallow in despair if you find yourself suffering from a sleep-related disorder.

If you’ve tried the mouthpieces, tried the nasal strips and the weird chin straps that are supposed to prevent you from snoring and it’s still happening, make an appointment with your health care professional. It’s possible that you’re suffering from something else and you should get that dealt with sooner rather than later. There are ways to get rid of snoring to help improve your life, but make sure you speak with a health care professional first.

You’ll be surprised at how easy you’ll sleep afterwards.

Insomnia and Snoring: The Worst Best Friends

holding-hands-1149411_960_720Everyone knows the sounds of snoring. We’ve all heard them growing up either from family members or on television. In cartoons snoring is usually over exaggerated and used to let the watcher know the person is supposed to be sleeping. They must be truly sleeping to snore, too, not just faking it. While it’s all well and good to laugh over these funny antics on the television, the fact of the matter is that snoring is not only a telling sign of comic relief.

Did you know that snoring can be a sign of underlying health problems? Snoring can betray sleep apnea and a host of other medical issues. Snoring and every dreamers enemy, insomnia, have been linked to something devastating: strokes.

Sleep-disordered breathing and sleep-wake disturbances represent both a risk factor and a consequence of stroke affecting stroke recovery, outcome and recurrence, a review confirmed.

The meta-analysis of prospective clinical and population-based studies noted that more than 50% of patients with transient ischemic attack (TIA) and stroke have sleep-disordered breathing.

Sleep-disordered breathing is an independent stroke predictor (OR 2.24; CI 1.57 to 3.19), and that stroke risk increases with apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), Dirk M. Hermann, MD, of University Hospital Essen, Germany, and Claudio L. Bassetti, MD, of University Hospital Bern, Switzerland, reported online in Neurology.

“There is solid evidence linking sleep-related breathing disturbances (e.g., obstructive sleep apnea), insomnia (lack of sleep), and hypersomnia (excessive sleep) with stroke and disturbed stroke recovery,” Hermann told MedPage Today. “Sleep-related breathing disturbances and sleep-wake disturbances should carefully be monitored in stroke patients on stroke units and rehabilitation wards. Here, clinical routines should be implemented for sleep assessment and patient treatment.”

The researchers cautioned that clinicians should proceed with care when using pharmacologic approaches to sleep-wake disturbances in the management of stroke and TIA.
Similarly, while sleep-wake disturbances can be detected with careful patient histories, questionnaires, and actigraphy, treatment is relevant for stroke recovery and outcome and “should be used thoughtfully considering potential side effects,” they said.

“Treatment of sleep-wake disturbances with hypnotics and sedative antidepressants (insomnia), activating antidepressants or stimulants (hypersomnia), dopaminergic drugs (restless leg syndrome), and clonazepam [Klonopin] (parasomnias) are based on single case observations and should be used with caution.”

Via: http://www.medpagetoday.com/cardiology/strokes/59501 

As if the annoyance of snoring wasn’t bad enough. Those who suffer from insomnia will tell you it’s no walk in the park. Not being able to rest when you truly need it can be devastating. Not being able to sleep without your snoring either waking you up or causing your partner to wake you up is also undesirable. If you or someone you know suffers from snoring or insomnia it would be in their best interests to speak with a health care professional.

Yes, there are devices and medication that can assist with snoring and sleeplessness, respectively, but if you’re concerned about your risk of stroke you need to speak with a medical professional. Once you’ve been seen and assessed you can work with your doctor on determining what mouthpiece might work best for you or if there is something else you need to consider.

Your health is no joke and it’s important that you are aware and understand everything that happens. If you have a history of heart disease in your family that’s all the more reason to get yourself checked out. Don’t let snoring and insomnia pull a fast one on you.

Common Ways To Stop Snoring You Forgot About

We’re no strangers to the rules our parents have instilled in us as children. Rules like washing our hands before we eat, not eating food off the floor (aside from the 5 second rule) and to always use our manners. These sorts of things are taken for granted and thought of as common sense. The reality about common sense is that it’s not common at all! Due to that, there are times when we’ll forget these little rules and tips we’ve learned about and fall out of practice.

thinkerThe same thing goes for those who have snoring issues. There are many common sense tips out there that you can practice in your life to reduce or eliminate your snoring. Since you’ve probably forgotten all about them they might seem wondrous or revolutionary, but trust that they’re just common tricks that can really make life so much easier:

1. Unclog Nasal Passages

Dr. Mark Hendricks, the sleep services director at Fairview Park Hospital in Georgia, shared to Fox News that taking hot showers before sleeping will help clear the nasal passages. Unclogged nasal passages facilitate slower and more silent airflow. Contrastingly, clogged or narrowed nasal passages cause airflow to move hastily thereby producing the loud snoring sound.

 2. Shed Some Weight

Losing weight could cure some snorers, but results may vary from person to person. If you began snoring the same time you added considerable amount of weight, reverting back to your initial weight could stop the snoring.

“If you gain weight around your neck, it squeezes the internal diameter of the throat, making it more likely to collapse during sleep, triggering snoring,” sleep expert and otolaryngologist Daniel Slaughter explained. He clarified that snoring is not exclusive to plump individuals as “thin people snore too.”

3. Good Sleeping Posture

Sleeping on your back makes the base of your tongue and soft palate collapse to the back of your throat. This hinders proper airflow and causes a vibrating sound during sleep. To remedy this. sleep experts recommend sleeping on your side as this prevents the base of your tongue from collapsing into the back of your throat.

“A body pillow (a full-length pillow that supports your entire body) provides an easy fix,” Dr. Sudhansu Chokroverty of JFK Medical Center told Web MD. “Or you can recline the bed with the head up and extended, which opens up nasal airway passages and may help prevent snoring.”

 4. Combat Inflammation

Inflammation can narrow nasal and throat passages, which causes hasty airflow and loud snoring noises. New York-based naturopathic doctor Gabrielle Francis revealed that chronic snorers can add herbs such as ginger, turmeric and Boswellia into their diet to combat inflammation.

Via: http://www.parentherald.com/articles/47801/20160606/5-amazingly-simple-tips-stop-partner-snoring.htm

None of these things cost loads of money and they are probably things your parents have told you about before. Maybe your doctor has mentioned it in passing but it sounds so natural you’ve forgotten to actually put it into practice. Now these aren’t quick fixes and won’t stop your snoring after one night. With a proper plan in place and dedication you can integrate these common sense tips into your routine.

The one thing that was missed by the doctor in this case? Snoring mouthpieces. A great choice for a MAD mouthpiece is the ZQuiet (http://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/zquiet), whereas the tongue retaining champion is easily the Good Morning Snore Solution (http://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/good-morning-snore-solution).

It all depends on how much sleep you’d like to get. If you share a bed with someone and you’re the one who snores, you’ll be doing yourself all kinds of favors if you get this issue under wraps.

It can be done and if you’ve already tried most, or all, of these tips and find that you’re still snoring, make an appointment with your healthcare provider. You might have an underlying condition that requires more specific care.

Once you’ve ruled everything out and gotten all your ducks in a row, you’ll be sleeping pretty.

Depression And Sleep In Young Women: A Dangerous Mix

depression-and-sleepWomen almost always have a lot going on. Whether it's dealing with various life issues like motherhood, working hard for half the pay your male coworker gets or cringing over taxes on feminine hygiene products (taxes haven't been removed on this everywhere yet!), it turns out the amount of sleep you get can impact your chances of developing or worsening depression. This is especially true for young women who are trying to balance life being a college or university student.

Like we said: as if you don't have enough going on.

Fret not! Just because you find out that there are links between certain sleep issues and depression doesn't mean all hope is lost:

One night of short sleep may lead to less depression the following day, but chronic short sleep is tied to greater depression overall for young women, according to a new study.

'The overall message that poor quality and insufficient sleep lead to poor mood, which, in turn, worsens sleep was not surprising,' said lead author David A. Kalmbach of the University of Michigan Medical School in Ann Arbor.

More noteworthy, he added, was that these relationships were evident in healthy, young women, not just insomniacs or depressed people.

The researchers studied 171 female college students for two weeks, beginning with an in-person questionnaire assessment of anxiety and depression levels and continuing with daily self-reported measures of mood and anxiety. The women also reported their total sleep time, time to fall asleep, and ratings of sleep quality each night.

On average, the women slept for seven hours and 22 minutes each night, taking 21 minutes to fall asleep. Overall, they rated their sleep quality 'fairly good.'

At the start of the study, a third of the women scored in the 'at risk' range for depression and 17 percent had clinically significant anxiety.

Women who averaged less sleep per night over the two-week period tended to report greater 'anhedonic' depression symptoms, or the inability to enjoy pleasurable things. But they also tended to report more of these symptoms the day after a night of particularly long sleep, as reported in Sleep Medicine.

One night of sleep deprivation may improve mood the following day. But unfortunately, 'therapeutic effects of a night of sleep deprivation are typically short-lasting, and because chronic sleep deprivation increases depression-risk, the therapeutic benefit of sleep deprivation on depression is modest at best,' Kalmbach said.

Via: http://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-sleep-depression-idUSKCN0YI2FL

The important thing that you should do once you've identified a problem is figure out a way to fix it. It's possible you didn't know about this until someone told you, right? Now that you have the information it's your responsibility to do something about it.

If you think you may have a serious sleep disorder or suffer from depression you need to speak with your health care provider. The sooner you address the issue the faster you can manage it. Don't try to self-diagnose because, let's face it, Google is not a medical professional.

These people get paid the big bucks for a reason. Book an appointment and you'll begin your journey to sweet dreams.

Natural Remedies For Snoring: They’re Out There

natural-snoring-remediesSnoring can be a huge burden, and not just to those who snore. While the snorer is most likely getting a poor night's sleep their relationships with their partners and other members of their household tend to be strained and potentially at the point of breaking. There are many couples who have been together for years yet sleep in separate rooms because of one partner's snoring.

Snoring occurs when the airways are blocked. This can be due to congestion from sickness or allergies, relaxation of the tongue in the mouth or even just relaxation of the muscles in the throat. There are plenty of products on the market that can help you with your snoring such as nasal strips and mouthpieces. But if you're looking for something natural, these may not be for you. There are some natural options out there, but there are also things to consider first:

If your snoring drives your partner nuts'” or if you're victim of your loved one's snoozing'” this is for you.

Snoring occurs when the flow of air through the mouth is obstructed. There are a few things that can trigger snoring like colds, allergies, drinking alcohol, smoking and certain medications.

We recently got this tweet from a viewer:

My wife has a bad snoring problem and refuses to use any anti-snoring nasal gadgets. Are there any natural remedies that might help?

Chronic snorers can be at risk for serious health problems like sleep apnea, so you should always see your doctor to rule this condition out first. Dr. Mark Hendricks, the medical director of sleep services at HCA's Fairview Park Hospitalin Georgia said there are several ways to test for sleep apnea. Patients can stay overnight at a special sleep observatory where doctors can measure the number of times they stop breathing or have shallow breathing per hour, also known as apnea-hypopnea index (AHI).

'We can also do home sleep tests as well. Typically it is a small portable device where the patient has a sensor under the nose and on the finger to monitor air flow,' Hendricks told FoxNews.com.

Although the market is flooded with anti-snoring gadgets that claim they can reduce snoring, there are also effective natural remedies the can help.

  1. Proper sleep positioning
    Instead of sleeping on your back, lying on your side may help to keep the base of your tongue from collapsing into the back of your throat, which can obstruct breathing.

Via: http://www.foxnews.com/health/2016/06/05/5-ways-to-reduce-snoring-naturally.html

You'll find that there are five things to consider that are all natural and can help reduce or eliminate snoring. Naturally, we recommend one of our favorite mouthpieces, the Good Morning Snore Solution (read a review: http://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/good-morning-snore-solution/). None of these natural remedies involves anything outside your normal capabilities and you also don't have to enlist the services of a specialist. This makes them easy on the pocketbook and you'll have a better chance of actually trying these methods out.

Aren't you glad there are natural options out there aside from never sleeping again? Rest well, friend, and take solace in the fact that potentially; this too shall pass.